Boston Herald calls for government-run execution squads to MASS MURDER naturopaths, scientists and journalists who oppose mercury in immunizations

Mike Adams
NaturalNews

In the latest lunatic, insane example of “vaccine rage” now being pushed by the criminal vaccine industry and its corporate-run media prostitutes, the Boston Herald’s entire editorial staff has openly called for what are essentially government-run execution squads to mass murder scientists, naturopaths, chiropractors and journalists who question the safety of injecting children with mercury, a brain-damaging toxin still found in flu shot vaccines administered to children and expectant mothers.

Expressing any concern at all about the toxic, brain-damaging ingredients in vaccines “ought to be a hanging offense,” says the entire Boston Herald editorial staff in this shockingly violent article which espouses the murder of naturopathic physicians and scientists such as myself. According to the Boston herald, we should all be hanged to death after being identified and rounded up. Continue reading

Russian Company Adds Pre-Crime Emotional Recognition Tech To Surveillance Cameras

Nicholas West
Activist Post

Nearly all areas of the modern world have now adopted some form of surveillance camera apparatus. With the concurrent rise in biometric identification technology, we are now entering the next phase of unprecedented privacy reduction: surveillance cameras equipped with real-time facial recognition, tied into police departments.

Russian company NTechLab made headlines last year for its implementation of FindFace, a software that was applied to Russia’s social media site VKontakte and its nearly 300 million users. The software claimed a 70% success rate in matching any photo taken to a social media profile, allowing strangers to identify one another instantaneously. FindFace was an immediate hit, signing up half a million users in its first two months. Continue reading

EBOLA IS BACK: World Health Organization Declares Epidemic: “Taking It Very Seriously”

Marc Slavo
SHTFPlan

The World Health Organization has declared an Ebola epidemic in the North East region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. At least three deaths have thus far been linked to the virus:

One of those killed had tested positive for Ebola after coming down with a haemorrhagic fever last month in Bas-Uele, a province which borders the Central African Republic.

WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier has told Sky News that work is under way to find people who may have been in contact with the Ebola sufferer.

Ebola occasionally jumps from animals including bats and monkeys to humans – and without preventative measures, the virus can spread quickly between people.

The virus is fatal in up to 90% of cases, and the WHO recently developed an experimental vaccine for use in emergencies.

In a statement, the DRC’s health ministry said: “Our country must confront an outbreak of the Ebola virus that constitutes a public health crisis of international significance.”

The WHO has warned that the virus could resurface at any time, as it can linger in the eyes, central nervous system and bodily fluids of some survivors.

The virus originated in a remote region of the Congo, but WHO is tracking down any possible contact the victims had with others. The virus, when detected, often originates in remote regions, but because of international air travel and other modes of transportation, could spread quickly to neighboring villages, then regions, then countries.

In 2013 an Ebola epidemic killed some 11,000 people worldwide as governments across the globe attempted to contain the virus.

There was at least one confirmed case of the virus in Dallas, Texas at the time, which sent the entire medical system into panic.

Though Ebola doesn’t move as quickly as a cold or flu, it is significantly more deadly, and according to the following model it could potentially spread fairly rapidly should it escape containment. It would take only one individual to make it through an airport checkpoint and all bets are off:

Microsoft founder Bill Gates warned earlier this year that the world is not prepared to deal with a widespread contagion and that viruses like Ebola or modified biological weapons could kill hundreds of millions of people in a truly global outbreak.

What to do Now…

While the current outbreak of Ebola has reportedly been isolated to less than a handful of individuals in a remote region of the world, it is often the case that such epidemics and pandemics begin under the same circumstances. Experts at the CDC, WHO and other organizations are usually able to contain them, but as highlighted by the events of 2013, sometimes the virus gets out.

What was not being said publicly in 2013 is researchers have warned that Ebola’s hyper-evolution could potentially lead it to mutate into something even deadlier than the current strain, meaning that as it touches more humans it could develop the ability to infect hosts faster, and even spread through the air.

In short, at any moment, an outbreak such as the current contagion identified in the Congo could go global, and at much higher rates of infection than previously seen.

It is for this reason, and the fact that governments around the world actively work to create even deadlier biological weapons, plus the possibility of ice melt in the Arctic releasing deadly ancient viruses, that we encourage readers to stay actively prepared for such a scenario.

It will come seemingly out of nowhere and by the time the public is made aware of the seriousness of the crisis it will likely be too late for most, as emergency supplies will have been cleared from grocery store shelves and safety retailers within a matter of hours.

Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com explains the signs to look for to know when it’s time to go into pandemic lockdown mode:

The time to make preparations for a worst-case scenario is now. The following are six key warning signs you should be looking for. When these events come to pass or you see these signals, you should strongly consider implementing a self quarantine lockdown:

  1. Emergency officials say they have the situation under control, but more cases continue to pop up.
  2. Local and state governments officially declare an emergency.
  3. Cases have been identified at your local hospital or at schools in your general vicinity.
  4. The general public begins to panic and store shelves start running out of key supplies like food and bottled water.
  5. Looting and lawlessness occurs within the local community.
  6. The virus breaches a 50-mile radius surrounding your home or town.

If any of these signs begin to appear around you, it’s time to seriously consider distancing yourself from society, and especially highly dense venues like retail stores, sporting events or schools.

Pennington also recommends considering preparations for a sick room in the event a virus breaches your 50-mile safety zone. Among other things to stock in your sick room, core protective gear like bio-threat rated full body suits, respiratory protection, hand sanitizers and even emergency foods should be included.

Odds are that the current Ebola epidemic identified in Africa will be contained and it will never reach U.S. shores. But someday a deadly virus with the ability to spread rapidly and kill over 90% of its infected victims will make it out of containment. When that day comes, you’ll be glad you were prepared for it.

China’s Spending $500 Billion to Reshape the World in Its Image

Bloomberg

China is one of the few countries in the world today with money to spend, and Xi Jinping is ready to write some checks.

China’s president will host almost 30 world leaders in Beijing on Sunday at the first Belt and Road Forum, the centerpiece of a soft-power push backed by hundreds of billions of dollars for infrastructure projects. More than 100 countries on five continents have signed up, showing the demand for global economic cooperation despite rising protectionism in the U.S. and Europe.

For Xi, the initiative is designed to solidify his image as one of the world’s leading advocates of globalization while U.S. President Donald Trump cuts overseas funds in the name of “America First.” The summit aims to ease concerns about China’s rise and boost Xi’s profile at home, where he’s become the most powerful leader since Deng Xiaoping died in 1997.

The Belt and Road Initiative “will likely be Xi’s most lasting legacy,” said Trey McArver, the London-based director of China research for TS Lombard, an investment research company. “It has the potential to remake global — particularly Asian — trade and economic patterns.”

The strategy also carries risks. The initiative is so far little more than a marketing slogan that encompasses all sorts of projects that China had initiated overseas for years, and major world leaders like Trump, Angela Merkel and Shinzo Abe are staying away. How Xi answers a range of outstanding questions will go a long way in determining its success.

Key to reducing uncertainty will be addressing the concerns of strategic rivals like India, Russia and the U.S., particularly as China’s growing military prowess lets it be more assertive over disputed territory. Chinese moves to spend more than $50 billion on an economic corridor in Pakistan, build a port in Djibouti and construct oil pipelines in central Asia are all creating infrastructure that could be used to challenge traditional powers.

“China needs to recognize that the way it perceives the Belt and Road Initiative is not necessarily the same way others will,” said Paul Haenle, a former China director on the U.S. National Security Council who now heads the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center in Beijing. For countries like the U.S., he said, “it’s impossible not to view the BRI through a geopolitical lens — a Chinese effort to build a sphere of influence.”

Excess Capacity

In September 2013, when Xi first pitched the plan at an obscure Kazakhstan university, he focused on the Eurasia landmass. Since then, it has repeatedly changed names and expanded to include the entire world, with the main goal of rebuilding the ancient trading routes from China to Europe overland and by sea.

One key driver was economic: China wants to spur growth in underdeveloped hinterlands and find more markets for excess industrial capacity. With more than $3 trillion in international reserves — more than a quarter of the world’s total — China has more resources than developed economies struggling to hit budget targets.

The plan gained steam last year when populist movements spurred a backlash against trade and immigration in the U.S. and Europe. Brexit raised questions about the European Union’s viability, while Trump’s withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership gutted the biggest U.S. push to shape global economic rules.

Trade Champion

“It was very disappointing, and it makes us feel that there is a big vacuum that Belt and Road can help to fill,” Cheah Cheng Hye, chairman and co-chief investment officer at the Hong Kong-based Value Partners Group. “So all of sudden, we begin to appreciate this Chinese initiative.”

Xi wasted no time filling the void. With exporting nations looking for a free-trade champion, he told the global elite in Davos, Switzerland, to resist protectionism and join China in boosting global commerce.

The U.S. and Europe “almost unwittingly” created space for Xi to push China’s interests, according to Peter Cai, research fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy.

“China is offering an alternative to the U.S. version of globalization,” Cai said. “In the Chinese case, it’s globalization paved by concrete: railways, highways, pipelines, ports.”

Draft Communique

This year, five European countries — Denmark, Finland, Switzerland, France and Italy — openly voiced support for the initiative. On trips to China in February, Italian President Sergio Mattarella proposed plans for the ports of Genoa and Trieste, while French Prime Minister Bernard Cazeneuve attended the arrival ceremony of a freight train from Lyon.

The summit will feature the likes of Russia’s Vladimir Putin, Greece’s Alexis Tsipras and the Philippines’ Rodrigo Duterte. The U.S. will send Matt Pottinger, a special assistant to Trump and senior director for East Asia on the National Security Council, according to State Department spokesman Justin Higgins.

A draft communique circulated before the event combined a commitment to open markets with endorsements of China’s diplomatic goals, Bloomberg reportedWednesday, citing people familiar with the document. It also generated some controversy among Beijing-based diplomats who said they didn’t have enough time to vet the document, underscoring the initiative’s potential to cause conflict.

$500 Billion

China has invested more than $50 billion in Belt and Road countries since 2013, according to the official Xinhua News Agency. Credit Suisse Group AG said this month that China could pour more than $500 billion into 62 countries over five years.

China’s state-run companies like China National Petroleum Corp. and China Mobile Ltd. — the world’s largest wireless carrier — are positioned to reap the rewards. Executives from six of China’s largest state-run firms sought to reassure the public this week that the risks were manageable.

China’s three development banks, its Silk Road Fund and the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank were involved in $39 billion of lending outside of the country last year, up about 50 percent from 2014, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

“One Belt, One Road — I think, it is potentially a plus,” JPMorgan Chase International Chairman Jacob Frenkel told Bloomberg Television on Friday. “And we should not worry about it because what it does is basically connects hundreds of millions of people, hundreds of millions of markets. And you know what? If somebody gains from it, that’s perfectly fine.”

Still, financial hurdles are starting to appear. China’s slowing economic growth has left fewer resources to spend overseas. Its international reserves have fallen about 6 percent over the past year, and China needs a healthy amount to defend the yuan.

Some previous Chinese ventures abroad have turned sour. While China’s no-strings-attached approach to investment is generally welcomed by developing countries, they often have poor credit ratings and questionable governance. China has struggled to recoup loans in Venezuela and Africa, and several projects in Central Asia have spurred protests. Announcements with big dollar signs often fail to materialize.

Nonetheless, Chinese scholars see the sum of Xi’s plan as bigger than any individual project. It represents a “profound change” in how China interacts with the world, according to Wang Yiwei, director of at Renmin University’s Institute of International Affairs in Beijing, who has written three books on the initiative.

“China has moved from a participant of globalization to a main leader,” he said. “It’s Globalization 2.0.”

— With assistance by Ting Shi, and Miao Han

(Updates with U.S. representation to summit under ‘Draft Communique’ subheadline. A previous version of this story corrected the amount of lending by China-related development banks and funds.)

 

Forced Vaccinations Violate Constitutional Rights, Sweden’s Parliament Declares

Catherine J. Frompovich
Activist Post

May 10, 2017 is a day that ought to live in infamy!  Why?  The Parliament of progressive Sweden adopted a decision, which contained several motions, one being “it would violate our [Swedish Constitution] if it introduced compulsory vaccination, or mandatory vaccination.”

Here is the original text in Swedish of what transpired. Continue reading

The Imperative of Replacing Google and Facebook

Tony Cartalucci
New Eastern Outlook

Nations are beginning to take more seriously the control of their respective information space after years of allowing US-based tech giants Google and Facebook to monopolize and exploit them.

Vietnam, according to a recent GeekTime article, is the latest nation to begin encouraging local alternatives to the search engine and social media network in order to rebalance the monopoly over information both tech giants enjoy in the Southeast Asian country today. Continue reading

Police given access to DHS’s massive biometric database

Mass Private I

According to an article in Texas Public Radio, law enforcement will now have access to DHS’s massive biometric database.

“Texas law enforcement are now getting a big assist from the federal government. Texas is the first and only state to get access to a massive Department of Homeland Security biometric database…” Continue reading

New FBI Boss: Trump Looks At Surveillance State Advocate Mike Rogers

Kurt Nimmo
Another Day in the Empire

President Trump is considering the former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee to replace James Comey, according to Bloomberg.

Rogers is a seasoned swamp veteran and an ardent supporter of the surveillance state.

Continue reading

Weather modification programs have been run by the US government since 1953

Jayson Veley
Natural News

A few weeks ago, New York Times Magazine ran a column that asks if it’s ok “to tinker with the environment to fight climate change.” The piece, written by Jon Gertner, discusses a proposal made by Harvard Professor David Keith to use ten Gulfstream jets to spray 25,000 tons of liquid sulfur gas into the atmosphere in an attempt to combat global climate change. While Professor Keith argues that this sort of solar engineering is technologically feasible, he admits to having a tough time trying to determine whether or not such a practice is ethical. (RELATED: NASA admits to spraying Americans with poisonous chemtrails). Continue reading

Coca-Cola teams up with grocery giant Albertsons to steal your smartphone information … invasive “Minority Report” marketing goes mainstream

Ethan Huff
NaturalNews

Struggling to maintain its customer base amid lagging sales, soft drink giant Coca-Cola has developed a new program in partnership with grocery supermarkets that invades people’s smartphones in order to steal their private information and send them custom-tailored coupons and other marketing material – this, after previously attempting to boost sales by pushing soda for breakfast.

Albertsons is reportedly the first grocery chain to adopt the technology, which utilizes digital signage placed at grocery end caps that targets shoppers and drives them towards the beverage aisle. Once there, shoppers are offered coupons and other promotions designed to entice them to buy more high-fructose corn syrup-laden soft drinks. Continue reading