Building Your Own Firearm (Part 5 – Manufacturing the AR-15 Receiver)

John Hertig

The Prepper Journal

Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: The last two entries in John’s series on Building Your Own Firearm are longer than what has been normally posted on The Prepper Journal. Today’s entry, and next Tuesday’s entry contain a lot of valuable information and are definitely worth the time to read, even if you are not currently building a firearm. And, as always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

 

Last time (Building Your Own Firearm (Part 4 – AR-15 Upper Parts), we finished discussing the parts required.  The next step is to “manufacture” the receiver.  For each case, I will include a link to a video or videos, and then add my comments.

Drill Press and Jig

The receiver was the reinforced polymer Tennessee Arms “Liberator”, pictured above, and the jig was the one which came with it.  The jig is “sacrificial” or “one time use”, and it looks it.  But then it did not cost that much, less than $25.

The package arrived in an incredible two days and at first glance looked and felt very nice.  The engraving was so-so; not as big as it could be and not at all centered (I asked for a non-standard location and their equipment couldn’t handle it); the serial number meets the BATFE minimum character height, but “dense” characters such as “5” are kind of a blob.  I advise you to specify a larger font for the serial number.  Also, consider the fiber optic laser for the image if it has any detail; the CO2 laser cuts deeper but does not handle detail as well.  The receiver has Safe/Fire markings AND safety selector stops on both sides of the receiver; a plus.  Another plus is the enlarged trigger guard built in.  There were no instructions in the package; it turns out they are supposed to be sent in an email, and they resent them upon request.  I also found a link to the instructions on the site.  Their return policy is VERY good; even if I destroy a receiver, a replacement can be had for the cost of filling out a form and shipping them the pieces (as required by BATFE) of the old one and $8.00 for the return shipping.

I’ve been told that one should avoid using lubricants with any penetrating additives on polymer as it may affect it, and acetone in any form, as it will eat it.

Here is a set of videos of the receiver being finished:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzJTuC-CqCU   &   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUd__AQSwsM

The fellow in these videos mentions several concerns.  MY first concern was that the fellow did not use a vise; I’m astonished he did not ruin it, since on mine, at least, the bottom of the jig is NOT FLAT and rocks side to side.  I strongly suggest using a vice.  The vise will prevent the thing from tipping any from vertical, and can add mass to the unit, dampening the tendency to move in undesired directions.  Before starting, it is a good idea to ensure that your (tilting) drill table is perpendicular to a drill in the chuck (using a right angle gauge) and the top of the jig in the (angle) vice is parallel to the drill table.  A circular level is handy for checking this.

HIS first concern was that one of the bolts was not long enough.  If you run into this, DON’T use a wood screw as he originally suggested.  Call Tennessee Arms or go to the hardware store (or your junk drawer) and get a bolt, lock washer and nut which does fit.  They do now include the longer bolt in the package, and mine came with all six screws, lock washers and nuts.  It says to drill out the jig holes with the included 5/32 bit, and I did drill out and bolt all six jig clamping holes despite the instructions only pointing to five.  Check for any gap at each clamp point; nothing I did could get rid of a gap between the jig sides on top at the buffer tube end.  Tennessee Arms said this would be OK, as was my drilling and bolting the 6th jig hole.

The fellow in the video complained about the depth to drill which is somewhat odd.  Perhaps he should take that up with Armalite who invented the receiver with those dimensions.   🙂  The depths ARE difficult to measure with a standard ruler, but a digital caliper makes it easier.  Since these calipers generally have a built in depth gauge, it was easy to double check the depth of the hole before locking in the drill press depth stop.  Drilling the holes produces a lot of big chips which fill up the cavity in the jig so you can’t see to place the next hole.  After each hole, use a vacuum cleaner to suck out the chips, or pick up the vice and turn it over to clean them out.  It was “impossible” to get exactly 1.22″ deep on the second pass; going over by 0.01″ or 0.02″ did not seem to be a problem, but don’t go any further.  I also checked each of the second pass (final) holes to make sure the depth stop didn’t move on me.  The masking tape marker is a good idea, although I used something with a bit more “stick” (metallic duct tape) as a guide for the first hole to set the depth gauge, and a safety check for the other holes.  I should have used something with a distinctive color as the silver did not contrast against the drill.  And, I used the depth stop on my drill press for both passes, as he did for the second pass.  Using the depth stop on the second pass is critical; there are too many chips and not enough of the top surface left visible for the tape to be a reliable indicator on the second pass.

When milling, he held the chuck down with one hand and moved the receiver with the other, and my drill press does not have a quill lock either.  I could have used the table elevation crank, but since it turned out to be quicker and easier to make shallow cuts, this was not needed.  Be careful not to let the cutting part of the bit touch the sides of the template (the jig material is quite thin and soft) until the bit is deep enough that the cutting edges are below the template.  The bit cuts better if you move it in a clock-wise direction around the jig cavity.  The chips from milling are much finer than those from drilling, and you don’t need to see the bottom until near the end, so you can mill for a fair amount of time before emptying the chips out.  The fellow in the video found that the buffer tube end of the jig did not allow him to mill to the correct depth.  I think he had the bit chucked too far in; I had the end mill clamped in the chuck with nearly 2 1/2″ exposed below the chuck and it just cleared the high point of the jig.  But you can cut the jig like he did if you need to.

I don’t know why he thought this task was so tedious.  It looks like he tried to mill the entire .61″ at once, or maybe his drill press was not going fast enough; I set mine on 3000 RPM and the milling went quite quickly when lowering the bit perhaps 1/8″ per pass.  Now fitting the hammer and trigger CAN be a bit tedious, because the shaft of the mill bit is slightly bigger than the mill itself, so when it rides on the jig, it will not cut quite enough from the sides.  I used a Dremil tool with a rotary cutter to open up the sides enough for the parts to fit.  The places where the width is critical are the areas around the trigger and hammer pins and above (a drop in trigger group would require a longer section to be the correct width).  Places where a tight fit should be avoided are the narrow section where the trigger bar travels, and the front edge so as not to bind up the hammer (but not too much or you’ll break through into the magazine catch spring channel).

The trigger slot jig is not very good.  It does not fit tightly in the top of the jig (maybe due to that gap in the main jig), so moves a bit when you use it, and comes out of the jig when you raise the bit.  Also, the slot in it is the size of the cutters, not the shank, which has to go through it.  This resulted in a too small trigger slot, which I had to lengthen and widen a little with the Dremil tool.

During assembly, he had some additional concerns (see them at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqdLHBktf00 ).  As mentioned, fitting the hammer (and trigger) is less tedious if using a Dremil tool with cutter and concentrating on only the critical areas.  As for the safety latch plunger issue, it was indeed a tight fit and there was some flashing in the hole from drilling the safety hole.  Rather than file on the pin, I just drilled the hole out slightly bigger with a number 30 drill (.128″).  The flange (lower) portion of the hole was tight also, so I drilled 3/16″ deep with a number 28 drill (.140″) and the plunger then moved freely.  For that matter, the safety was a bit sluggish in rotation although each side fit correctly by itself.  It appeared the two holes were not quite lined up, so I took the 3/8″ drill and ran it all the way from side to side (by hand) and that allowed the safety to rotate freely.

His final concern was the need to fit the upper to the receiver, and this seemed to be a serious problem.  I had to remove material from the front of the buffer tube socket AND the hole for the lug that the take-down pin goes through.  If it was one or the other, and the instructions documented what to do, I might have accepted the claim that this was “to ensure a tight fit for maximum accuracy”.  But since you can’t reliably tell where material needs to be removed and there are no instructions to guide you, you just have to hack at it until it fits, which seems counter to that “accuracy” claim as well as being a royal pain.  It turns out that the upper I was using was not mil-spec and so needed more fitting than would normally be required, but worse was when I threaded in the buffer tube and found that it was not threaded far enough (no threading beyond the brass insert) to get the tube in enough to capture the buffer stop.  I was able to “force” it those last couple of turns using a “strap” wrench, which “cut” the needed threads.  But it was quite difficult, and without the stock lock of the carbine tube to keep the strap wrench from slipping and the buffer tube socket being thinner due to the material I removed from the back, I doubt I could have managed it.  Trying this on another receiver which did not have any material removed from the back of the buffer tube socket, the polymer split above the brass insert.

This receiver manufacturing methodology worked quite well, but that was due primarily to the machine-ability of the polymer.  I strongly suspect it would be very much more of a challenge for an aluminum receiver, particularly a forged one (see my experiences with one below).  In this material, I could see this methodology being pretty good if the end mill shank was the same diameter as the cutter so it could ride on the jig and produce an accurate cavity.  Unfortunately, although I can tolerate the deficiencies of the supplied jig because it does work adequately and better ones are available, and because the fixes are fairly obvious and easy, I found the amount of effort required to get the buffer tube installed to be unacceptable.  This is a shame, because this really seemed to be an attractive option in so many ways.  Although these receivers can be made to work, I can’t enthusiastically recommend this particular version of this brand receiver (I cut them in half and sent them back; we’ll see in the next part that the replacements live up to their potential).

Router and Jig

The receivers were an anodized forged receiver with custom logo from Atomic Engraving and another polymer Liberator, and the jig was the Easy Jig and its tool set.  This is not a single use jig, and you can tell from how beefy it is.  Good thing, as the price for jig and bits is nearly $200.  You are supposed to be able to use it for up to 20 receivers, so the cost per unit can be quite reasonable.  If you mess up a part of the jig, all parts have replacements available.  Rather than “form fitting” around the receiver like the Liberator jig, this “universal” jig uses the take-down and pivot pin holes to index the receiver in the jig.  Although more versatile, a potential problem is that a couple of the steps have you taking out the bolt through the take-down pin hole which could allow the receiver to shift in the jig.  This did not occur in my experience.  The instructions are clear and the process easy to follow.

The forged receiver was very nice; noticeably heavier than the polymer ones.  The graphics were very good for the text, but the image was a “negative”.  That is, the black area of the image was cut into the receiver in white, and the white area of the image was left uncut, colored with the black anodizing.  A mil-spec upper fit perfectly in the forged receiver, but again not in the polymer one.

Here is a video showing the process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiHdV5slQps.  This one tends to put me to sleep; here is one which is more exciting, although there are some curse words in it:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_Prbh1ersc.  You choose, exciting or clean.

The first video suggests using WD-40 as a cutting lubricant, and that is not really the best choice, being more of a “penetrant” than a lubricant.   The second video suggests Tap Magic for Aluminum and that worked well for me with the forged receiver; no lubricant was necessary for the polymer one.

Be careful when drilling the two holes in the “rear” section (where the assembly lug of the upper goes).  I noted that on the Liberator receiver, the rear-most hole in the jig looked like it would get really close to the buffer stop hole, so didn’t drill it.  And when milling this area, I did not go all the way to the rear of the template because it was not necessary and would endanger the buffer stop hole.  Not only was it too long (in THIS case), the template was also too wide.  I found that I milled into the take down pin detent spring channel on the polymer receiver.  On the Atomic Engraving lower, no milling of the take-down lug pocket was required, so I could not see if the problems with the Liberator were due to that particular receiver (most likely) or the jig.

The first step, drilling, was quite tedious in the 7075 forged aluminum with a battery powered drill.  The same drill which did the entire set of holes in polymer on one battery charge with power left over was drained after only two holes in aluminum, and the pressure required was much greater, heating up the drill uncomfortably.  I then tried my old corded drill, but it was much slower than the modern battery drill.  I then tried my drill press.  This worked pretty well for part of each hole, although I had to go to the slowest speed (about 500 RPM) to avoid serious smoking.  But it would not go all the way to the bottom of the hole, having only 2 1/2″ of travel and needing at least 3 inches.  The way I got it done was drill the first hole(s) with the battery drill (it was easiest, perhaps because the drill was sharper or perhaps because the holes were close to the chip channel allowing the chips to escape easier).  Then I drilled the rest of the holes part way with the drill press and then removed the jig drill plate so the total depth was in range of my drill press.  Using the first (completed) hole to set the drill stop, I drilled the rest of the holes most of the way on the drill press.  Because of the tendency for the drill to bind, I left finishing the holes using the battery drill and the replaced drilling plate until after much of the milling was done.

The milling was quite easy in polymer, and even fairly easy in the 7075 forged aluminum with the router speed set to 26000 RPM, as the jig people recommended.  But based on my drilling experience, I did take very shallow passes in the aluminum; I found that only 1/64″ per pass (very easy to set using the suggested Ryobi laminate trimmer) was fairly smooth while any attempt to go deeper than that caused chattering.  Use the “tilt in” method from the second video rather than the “drop in slowly” method suggested in the instructions for the final (bottom) passes.  Both the aluminum and polymer cavities resulting were acceptable as is, with no need for fitting any of the parts.

When drilling the starting hole for the trigger slot, the odds of messing it up are very high.  It is HIGHLY recommended to get a center punch of the correct diameter in order to ensure the hole is centered.  If it is not, the end mill will not go into it, and after you grind/file the hole sideways so the end mill will fit, there will end up being a notch in the side of your trigger slot.  A drill press seems an adequate alternative to the correct center punch, and best would be to use both to ensure this critical hole is correctly placed.

With the exception of the take-down lug pocket possibly wanting to be too big (for the Liberator receiver, at least), this methodology can be a good choice, but it will take you a while (in forged aluminum anyway) unless you have better tools than mine.  Maybe a billet receiver would be less tedious without the “hardening” resulting from the forging process.  As for the Atomic Engraving receiver, it was an excellent choice, the engraving was pretty good, and the customer support outstanding.  It did need the safety detent hole drilled out with the #30 drill like the Liberator did, but did not need the #28 drill.

Now that we have a complete receiver, let’s get it assembled and try it out.  Tune in next time for the assembly process, and the results.

The post Building Your Own Firearm (Part 5 – Manufacturing the AR-15 Receiver) appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

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Calling ALL Contributors!

Wild Bill

The Prepper Journal

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: We are looking for new and varied entries for the Prepper Writing Contest. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

As you know guest Contributors have added significant value to the site and to our followers. Like Rick, more of you have a following than you know and our readers are anxious to hear more, hear of new things and of old things that have proven themselves over time and practice.

We would like to suggest articles on long-term food storage system successes and yes, even failures as that is how most of us learn. Articles on vehicle spare parts and supplies you NEVER go 4-wheeling without? What tools can’t you survive without and what tools can fill more than a single function thus reducing weight in your bug-out supplies?

Going back to an article titled “Am I The Only One Who Saw “TERMINATOR”, published on January 20th of this year, new articles have been published this week on significant advances in AI (Artificial Intelligence) and by very reputable scientists who have linked the next steps to make a self-sufficient robot. Change is good, change is constant and change affects us all, so what changes concern you?

If you have submitted something in the last 60 days we are going through those now and we thank you and we will get those out ASAP. So don’t be shy, we thrive on diverse opinions and good ideas. And as always, THANK YOU!

 

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Just what is Backfeeding?

Wild Bill

The Prepper Journal

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

Earthquake, Southern California, sitting in my kitchen at 5:25 am I felt the roll, heard the house creek and crack and through my dining room window saw the transformer a few blocks away blow. Spectacular. It was over quickly, family was fine, house had no damage on a first look, and no electricity, or natural gas as I had a seismic shut off valve on the gas line. This wasn’t my first rodeo. “Coffee!” I needed coffee so I went to the garage, got my portable camping stove, part of my survival gear, heated some water on it on the dining room table, pulled out the French Press…coffee!

Spouse got up about 20 minutes later, slid into a chair next to me and poured herself a cup and asked “why do we have a camping stove, we don’t camp”, we were newly married. I said nothing, just looked at her as her brain cells began to come on-line and a moment later I got a wry smile and an “oh.” From humble beginnings and knowing where I lived I started this journey and I became a believer in portable things. Especially portable generators as we slide down the food chain quickly without electricity.

No family home should be without one just as no home should be without a comprehensive first aid kit. Additionally, and equally, no one should have either unless they truly understand what each can do to both aide people and harm them.

While we could do a not-so-short course in electricity, circuits, breakers, grounds and phases herein, that information is on-line from reliable sources and I suggest a few hours of going through it would be time well spent for every building owner (home, office, plant, factory, etc.) You won’t pass any certification classes but you will be able to ask much smarter questions.

If you are thinking of installing a home generator as a backup system what I want to address herein is the dangers of not doing it right, specifically “backfeeding”. If you are just running some power strips off a well-ventilated fuel-powered portable generator things will work if you have enough extension cords to reach vital assets and you should pose no threat to yourself or others. Do be aware that in a SHTF situation the generator noise will expose your location. Prudent use and investing in some power storage systems will somewhat alleviate this exposure. There is a whole other post on these on this site and we will do an in-depth review of portable generators in the very near future.

However, if you are considering installing a stationary generator, what people do who plan to hunker down, to a home circuit panel you need to do it right or better yet, have it done professionally. Leaving every breaker on energizes the entire panel and power is distributed throughout the house, on all circuits. Only the largest portable generators (the word “portable” here being a euphemism) can supply enough power for an entire home, and the cost can be in the thousands of dollars. Do you need the A/C on (I ask this while living in Phoenix, writing this in the summer)? The pool pump? The washer and dryer, garage door openers, every flat-screen TV and game system? Does every room need power? You know the answer. Yes, for food storage, some outlets to charge batteries, cell-phones and electronics that link to the outside world, and any critical care medical equipment.  The rest is just fluff.

If your solution is to introduce a back-up generator through your homes electrical system, you will need to invest in a manual transfer switch which takes power from the generator and distributes it only to the branch circuits that were selected when the switch was installed. Each circuit has its own breaker, and electrical power is automatically confined to the dwelling. Paying a licensed electrician to do this is the only approach. This prevents “backfeeding” – accidentally powering the neighborhood utility lines coming into you home and endangering any utility workers, neighbors, etc. When you apply power to a circuit (your home electric panel) electricity flows to the path of least resistance, which, with no power coming from the utility lines, means they are a path of “least resistance” as they have no load on them, such as your refrigerator does on its circuit, so electric current flows from your house, back out to the power lines. In this “off and then ‘instant on’ with no warning” scenario the chances to injury or kill a utility worker are great, and you are liable (National Electric Codes 408, 702 and 225 provide strict guidance on the requirements of such generators.) Now multiple this across every home in an electrical grid and you will know why we should respect these guys (and girls.)

While one can argue that simply turning off some breakers helps to resolve this issue, it does so without balancing the loads across the circuits, and who wants to go out and pick and chooses those in real time?  Who knows how the circuits are set up in their breaker box in the first place? Preppers are planners and having this “locked down” is just good common sense. Identify the “must haves” and get a professional to hook up the system correctly. Ask way too many questions, write everything down and store the data with your survival kit. You will forget after time. Now, knowing this, would you ever touch a downed power line?

The post Just what is Backfeeding? appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

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Just How Far off the Grid Can You Get?

Wild Bill

The Prepper Journal

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

With the furthest you can get from a paved road in the lower 48 states being 22 miles, (Northeastern Wyoming) getting “off the grid” is a lot harder for most of us than we think.

Have you ever really been “off the grid?” What most would describe as “We are really going to spend a Friday night doing this?” to “the vacation from hell” to “Seriously Dad!?!?” is actually some of the best training a prepper can do. I walked the John Muir Trail one July, from the top of Mt. Whitney to Tuolumne Meadows, 210 miles, and never went more than an hour during daylight without seeing or hearing someone. Summers on the Appalachia Trail can be the same.  And, to settle the argument here and now, the John Muir Trail is a section of the Pacific Crest Trail that runs 2,650 miles from the Mexican Border to Canada, while the Appalachian Trail runs 2,200 miles from Georgia to Maine. Back on topic.

Every prepper needs to challenge themselves and their family to practice. To get off the grid. And the key to this is to start small and safe and then remove the fallbacks. One night at home, from dusk to dawn with no utilities, no electricity, no running water, no natural gas (fireplace, stove, BBQ hooked to home gas system) is a good first step. And no running water means no “bathroom” facilities unless you operate them using buckets of water carried from a water source such as a pool, or pond or lake. I assure you if you have not done this it will be eye-opening. And no cop-outs, no “we did this after that thunderstorm last year”, you know the one after dinner was cooked, consumed and the dishes were cleared and dealt with, the one where only the electricity was off. Dusk to dawn, with a meal at both ends done without electricity and running water, and no natural gas either, do it on a camp stove on camping cookware. It will be easy, it can be fun, especially if you don’t recharge phones and tablets the day of;-) Discussing and writing down “lessons learned” afterwards will be invaluable and help you comprise a survival list based in reality.

From this you can step it up at your own pace. Do it again but in the woods or out in the dessert. Whole different world. Do it for a couple of nights and bring only enough supplies for one – see if you can “ration”, if you can find things like more water, or other things to eat if you must. I know “seasoned” campers may turn their noses up at this but I have found that those with their well-stocked backpacks, packed travel trailers and latest high-tech gear are the first to panic when they run out of supplies and there is no camp supply store to fall back on. No disrespect to campers intended, they have a leg up already, but it is a big leap from spending time on the land to living off it.

And, before the Sourdoughs of the world chime in my experience in Alaska is you are “off the grid” as soon as you lose sight of a paved road. While I will get plenty of push-back on this, the last time I stayed at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage (hardly off any grid) a grizzly was tranquilized in a city park just 8 blocks away, a woman was killed by a black bear just south of Elmendorf AFB, and an Inuit child of 8 was killed by a grizzly near Iliamna Lake, all over a ten-day span. You have your “off the grid” definition, and I have mine. In any case, whatever your take on this aside, do visit Alaska if you get the chance as no artists’ palette has as many shades of green as you will find on the Kenai Peninsula in the summer. Spectacular walking in shorts on a blue-ice glacier with the brilliant green mountains everywhere. Again, back on topic.

Learning for yourself what you need physically and mentally to survive, how each member of your family will deal with things, how to keep your head, can only be done through practice under real conditions. And don’t stress about this as anyone stranded in the wilderness can be found within 72 hours of being reported missing (that is a big hint on how much supplies you should always bring) assuming two important things – someone knows and reports you missing, and you know and can plan on rationing your supplies accordingly, and, of course, you want to be found.

The lesson here is the one that applies to everything, practice makes better, maybe perfect after enough practice.

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[KR1098] Keiser Report: Zombie Economic Woes

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

In this episode of the Keiser Report’s annual Summer Solutions series Max and Stacy talk to Steve Keen, author of Debunking Economics, about whether or not allowing for the return of the business cycle might be a solution to our zombie economic woes. In the second half Karl Denninger of Market-Ticker.org offers his solution to the ever-worsening not so affordable healthcare crisis in America.

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Keeping Your Powder Dry!

Wild Bill

The Prepper Journal

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

Most of us have lived through the “Dark Days” – The Great Ammo Shortage of ’08 – ’13. Dark days, indeed. If you were like me, your days alternated between agonizing mental arithmetic and staking out the ammo counter at the local Walmart from across the aisle in the automotive section, waiting for the next shipment to arrive. Cabala’s used to advertise that ammo deliveries would make it to the display floor just before opening on Thursdays, there was always a line waiting for the opening Thursdays.

Many days I found myself wanting to train, wishing I had paid more attention to the proverb of the ant who “provides her meat in the summer, and gathers her food in the harvest”. Deciding between saving and training will always be hard for those of us short on cash. Plain and simple. However, having the proper storage system in place can alleviate some of the burden of storing ammunition for the long-term and at least give us the sense that we have done all in our power to preserve its integrity.

The Perfect Container for Ammunition Storage

The perfect container for ammunition storage can lock out air and humidity, while providing protection against extreme heat. Surplus military ammo cans have been a prepping staple for years, however, these cans rely on an o-ring around the edge to keep out humidity and air. The downside is those seals can go bad. If you have these you should lubricate the o-rings on a regular basis. Any true mountaineer treats his/her waterproof boots with a bees-wax coating at the end of the winter to keep them from cracking over the summer and at the beginning of the winter in preparation for the coming snows. This same product is used to preserve the o-rings on swimming pool equipment and is available at any pool supply store as well as Walmart, Home Depot and Lowes. A thin coating is all that is required. WD40 also works but can break down in high heat and, yes, even the ArmorAll you use on your car can work. – an aside as this should always be used on the rubber seals of your vehicles doors, all of them, as well as your hood, and trunk, if you have one, to keep them from cracking as well.

 

In 2017 you should pass on nostalgia and macho and consider purchasing one of the newer plastic ammo cans which do look “tacticool”! These are less likely to conduct heat, and with proper care, can retain their air tight features longer. Using any of the o-ring treatments above on these storage containers o-ring can prolong the life of the seal. These plastic ammo cans are a great investment, especially when you purchase the stack-able kind. I have them and they have yet to let me down. I label them by caliber of the ammo stored in each. One note, I have one very large one, 20″ x 24″ x 9″ and it stores so much ammo that where it sits now determines where I will have to make my last stand with its contents! Smaller and more are the way to go.

If you want to take it a step further, consider some “add-ons”. The zcorr anti corrosion bags are air and water tight. They also come with a humidity test card. Or, you could purchase a BluGuard .30 cal ammo can liner. When all else fails, silica gel packs endure. Consider stocking up on these.

Remember, airtight and watertight ammunition storage is a MUST.

The Do’s and Do Not’s of Ammunition Storage

Do seek to store your ammunition in a dry, cool, location. Do not store your ammunition in hot or humid locations. If you must store ammunition in a humid environment, use a dehumidifier. Don’t rely on older surplus ammo storage cans. Do choose your ammunition storage container wisely. Don’t plan on keeping the factory ammunition box. Do research your ammunition’s components before you purchase and never buy ammunition with a box date older than 10 years.

Final Thoughts

In my many years of managing a firearms store, the most successful preppers seemed to be the ones who consistently bought extra ammo. An extra box of ammo every two weeks can add up. Spreading your purchases out also offsets the financial burden. Having ample supplies of ammunition is a prepping must, as is not neglecting to protect your investment. Keeping your powder dry is a valuable lesson learned.

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Silver Analysts Forecast $20 In Bloomberg Silver Price Survey

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

– Bloomberg silver price survey – Large majority bullish on silver
– Silver median “12 month-forecast” of $20
– Precious metal analysts see silver “24 percent rally from current levels”
– Investors are pouring money into silver ETFs
– Speculative funds bearish even as ETF assets rise to record
– Spec funds being bearish is bullish as frequently signals bottom
– Important to focus not just on silver price but on silver value
– “Important to note that all portfolios under all conditions actually perform better with exposure to gold and silver” – David Morgan (see video)

From Bloomberg:

In a Bloomberg survey of 13 traders and analysts, the majority were bullish. 11 people said silver prices would rise and two predicted declines.

Among the seven respondents that provided estimates, the median 12-month forecast was $20 — indicating a 24 percent rally from current levels.

Assets in exchange-trade funds backed by silver have risen 6.6 percent since April 24 to 21,211 tons, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

In the same time, hedge funds turned negative as prices tumbled. In the week ended July 11, hedge funds were net short by 5,402 contracts, according to U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission data. Short positions have tripled since the week of April 25 to 60,775 contracts.

From GoldCore:

We continue to see silver as undervalued vis a vis gold but more especially vis a vis stocks, bonds and many property markets. Rather than selling the financial insurance that is gold, we would advise reducing allocations to stocks, bonds and property and allocating to silver.

If one is very overweight gold in a portfolio and has no allocation to silver than there is of course a case for selling some gold and reweighting a portfolio in order to diversify into silver.

Gold Silver Ratio – 10 Years

With the gold to silver ratio at 76 ($1235/$16.20/oz), the silver price is attractive at these levels and has the potential to be the surprise out performer in H2, 2017.

Silver’s industrial uses and coin and bar demand should see the gold/silver ratio gradually revert to the mean average in the last 100 hundred years which is close to 35:1. This was seen again in April, 2011 when the gold silver ratio fell to 32.4 with silver at $48/oz and gold at over $1,500/oz.

 

Read full story here…

Important Guides

For your perusal, below are our most popular guides in 2017:

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Switzerland

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Singapore

Essential Guide to Tax Free Gold Sovereigns (UK)

Please share our research with family, friends and colleagues who you think would benefit from being informed by it.

Special Offer – Gold Sovereigns at 3% Premium – London Storage

We have a very special offer on Sovereigns for London Storage today. Own one of the most popular and liquid of all bullion coins – Gold Sovereigns – at the lowest rates in the market for storage.

sovereign.png

  • Limited Gold Sovereigns (0.2354 oz) available
  • Pricing at spot + 3.0% premium
  • Allocated, segregated storage in London
  • Normally sell at spot gold plus 6.75% to 10%
  • One of most sought after bullion coins in the world
  • Mixed year, circulated bullion coins
  • Minimum order size is 20 coins

These coins are at a very low price and with limited amounts at these record low prices we expect them to sell out very fast.

Call our office today

UK +44 (0)203 086 9200
IRL +353 (0)1 632  5010
US +1 (302)635 1160

Link

Earth’s Economy Glorifies Waste, Exploitation, Debt, Expediency and Magical Thinking

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

How would extraterrestrial anthropologists characterize Earth’s dominant socio-economic system? It’s not difficult to imagine their dismaying report:

“Earth’s economy glorifies waste. Its economists rejoice when a product is disposed as waste and replaced with a new product. This waste is perversely labeled ‘growth.’

Aimless wandering that consumes fossil fuels is likewise rejoiced as ‘growth.’

The stripping of the planet’s oceans for a few favored species of edible fish is also considered ‘growth’ as the process of destroying the ocean ecosystem generates sales of the desired seafood.

Even more perversely, the resulting shortages are also causes of rejoicing by the planet’s elites, as their ability to purchase the now-scarce resources boosts their social status and grandiose sense of self-worth.

This glorification of waste is the same dynamic that destroyed the civilization on Zork.

Earth’s economy also glorifies exploitation, as this maximizes profits, which appears to be the planetary equivalent of a secular religion that everyone believes as a Natural Law.

Thus slavery and monopoly are highly valued as the most reliable sources of profits. If ethical concerns limit the actual ownership of humans, Earth’s economy incentivizes feudal arrangements that share characteristics of servitude and bondage. In the current era, the favored mechanisms are over-indebtedness (debt-serfdom) and taxation by the state, which extracts approximately 40% of all labor via threat of imprisonment.

Earth’s elites exhibit a pathological preference for micro-managing the commoners via criminalizing much of everyday life and imposing extremely harsh punishments for any dissent or resistance to elite domination.

This is the same dynamic that doomed planetary civilizations in the Blug system.

Earth’s economy is currently dependent on depleting fossil fuels and borrowing from the future to fund consumption in the present, i.e. debt. Rather than face the reality that this is not sustainable and pursue other arrangements, Earth’s elites have chosen expediency, responding to the inevitable crises caused by depletion and dependence on debt with expedient but ultimately destructive policies that paper over the crises but at the cost of generating greater crises in the next iteration.

Humanity appears to default to magical thinking when faced with untenable situations that demand systemic change. This is eerily parallel to the now-lost civilization of Frum.

It seems Earth’s dominant species has selected the most destructive policies and mindsets to glorify and worship. Earth’s current civilization is doomed, with near-zero prospects for the necessary transition to a more sustainable, less exploitive arrangement.

Earth’s decline is a tragi-comedy, much like the one on Ononon that entertained our home planet audiences for a time.”

In case you missed it, here’s a snapshot of total debt as a percentage of median household income: from 79% to 584%. If this strikes you as “healthy growth” because “debt doesn’t matter”– welcome to the Wonderland of Magical Thinking.

 

If you found value in this content, please join me in seeking solutions by becoming a $1/month patron of my work via patreon.com.

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“Bigger Systemic Risk” Now Than 2008 – Bank of England

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

– Bank of England warn that “bigger systemic risk” now than in 2008
– BOE, Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) concerns re financial system
– Banks accused of “balance sheet trickery” -undermining spirit of post-08 rules
– EU & UK corporate bond markets may be bigger source of instability than ’08
– Credit card debt and car loan surge could cause another financial crisis

– PRA warn banks returning to similar practices to those that sparked 08 crisis
– ‘Conscious that corporate memories can be shed surprisingly fast’ warns PRA Chair

Bank of England sees bigger financial risks than in 2008

Editor Mark O’Byrne

Stark warnings have been issued by the Bank of England and its regulatory arm, the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA).

In less than one week the two bodies issued papers and speeches to warn industry members that many banks are showing signs of making the same mistakes that led to the 2008 financial crisis – the outcomes of which are predicted to be worse than those seen just nine years ago.

Increased risks have been noted at different ends of the financial system, from the European corporate bond markets right through to retail lenders.

The Bank of England’s ‘Stimulating Stress Across the Financial System’ was released last week. It looks at how it will assess risk in future studies on the European corporate bond market. It concludes that the corporate bond market could create more instability during the next financial shock than it did in the crisis of 2008.

Just two days before this stark warning, the PRA’s chief-executive Sam Woods told lenders that they were on thin ice with their innovations designed to reduce their capital requirements and buoy earnings. Woods said that whilst their innovations “might meet the letter of the regulation” they must not be “designed to circumvent the spirit” of banking rules.

Bank of England’s Woods accused banks of engaging balance sheet trickery to “circumvent the spirit” of post-financial crisis rules.

Both warnings over both sets of practices is yet another reminder of the stark difference of interests between taxpayers, regulators and the banking industry.

News of institutions circumventing regulations and non-bank corporate lenders creating more risk in the system begs the question if the financial system as we know it will ever be fit for purpose in terms of looking after the needs of borrowers and savers. It also rises concerns about how safe the banks are for depositors and whether banks are ‘safe for savers?’

Balance sheet shenanigans

One of the ‘innovations’ being used by banks is the very same that was used in the run-up to and exacerbated the 2008 financial crisis. It is the use of special purpose vehicles which are used to hold riskier assets in order to free up capital.

Woods told the news conference:

“We have noticed that some institutions are now moving on-balance-sheet financing to off-balance-sheet formats using special purpose vehicles, derivatives, agency structures or collateral swaps.”

 

Read full story here….

Important Guides

For your perusal, below are our most popular guides in 2017:

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Switzerland

Essential Guide To Storing Gold In Singapore

Essential Guide to Tax Free Gold Sovereigns (UK)

Please share our research with family, friends and colleagues who you think would benefit from being informed by it.

Special Offer – Gold Sovereigns at 3% Premium – London Storage

We have a very special offer on Sovereigns for London Storage today. Own one of the most popular and liquid of all bullion coins – Gold Sovereigns – at the lowest rates in the market for storage.

sovereign.png

  • Limited Gold Sovereigns (0.2354 oz) available
  • Pricing at spot + 3.0% premium
  • Allocated, segregated storage in London
  • Normally sell at spot gold plus 6.75% to 10%
  • One of most sought after bullion coins in the world
  • Mixed year, circulated bullion coins
  • Minimum order size is 20 coins

These coins are at a very low price and with limited amounts at these record low prices we expect them to sell out very fast.

Call our office today

UK +44 (0)203 086 9200
IRL +353 (0)1 632  5010
US +1 (302)635 1160

Link

The reward for mining Maxcoin was just cut in half

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert

Maxcoin just experienced a major milestone in its lifespan. The reward for mining a block (a block = a ledger of transaction data) was just cut in half from 16 maxcoins to 8. This means that miners will get 8 maxcoins per block they mine, compared to 16 before the halving.

Don’t worry! This is all supposed to happen! Read more: The reward for mining Maxcoin was just cut in half

More:
Maxcoin FAQ
How to Mine Maxcoin?

Link