Pope Francis tells Korean religious leaders to oppose “rhetoric of hatred”

CRUX

Amidst rising tensions between North Korea and the United States, Pope Francis told an interfaith gathering of religious leaders from South Korea that they are called to be “heralds of peace, proclaiming and embodying a nonviolent style, a style of peace, with words clearly different from the narrative of fear, and with gestures opposed to the rhetoric of hatred.”

Pope Francis told religious leaders from South Korea that they are called upon to initiate, promote and accompany processes for the reconciliation of all people.

Representatives from the seven main religious groups on the peninsula are in Rome for an interfaith pilgrimage, amid growing tensions between North Korea and the United States.

President Donald Trump this week said “all options are on the table” after nuclear-armed Pyongyang fired a Hwasong-12 medium range missile over Japan which landed in the Pacific Ocean.

North Korea state media said the missile launch was “the first step of the military operation of the [North Korean military] in the Pacific and a meaningful prelude to containing Guam.” North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has repeatedly threatened to attack the U.S. Pacific territory, which has a population of 162,000 people.

Amidst the heated rhetoric, Archbishop Igino Kim Hee-joong, the president of the Korean Bishops’ Conference, said ahead of the audience they would ask the pope to pray for peace and to help the Korean people.

The archbishop told the SIR news agency – which is an arm of the Italian bishops’ conference – the religious leaders were appealing to “seek peace not with weapons or sanctions but through dialogue, negotiation and mutual respect at all costs.”

Francis told the leader the world is looking to them to set an example.

“It looks to us for answers and a shared commitment to various issues: The sacred dignity of the human person, the hunger and poverty which still afflict too many peoples, the rejection of violence, in particular that violence which profanes the name of God and desecrates religion, the corruption that gives rise to injustice, moral decay, and the crisis of the family, of the economy and, not least of all, the crisis of hope,” he said.

 

“We are called to be heralds of peace, proclaiming and embodying a nonviolent style, a style of peace, with words clearly different from the narrative of fear, and with gestures opposed to the rhetoric of hatred,” the pope said.

Although not mentioning the North Korean threat specifically, the pope said interreligious dialogue is directed to the common good and peace, and must always be open and respectful.

“Open, that is to say warm and sincere, carried forward by persons willing to walk together with esteem and honesty,” Francis explained. “Respectful, because mutual respect is at once the condition and the goal of interreligious dialogue: Indeed, it is in respecting the right to life, physical integrity and fundamental freedoms, such as those of conscience, religion, thought and expression, that the foundations are laid for building peace, for which each of us is called to pray and work.”

Francis did speak about the North Korean nuclear crisis during his flight back from Egypt last April.

At the time, the pope called on Trump and other world leaders to reinforce the push for a diplomatic solution to the mounting crisis, and asked the United Nations to “resume its leadership” to help diffuse the situation, saying the UN’s role “has been a bit watered down.”

“I’ve called on [world leaders], and I will call on them, to work towards resolving the problems through the path of diplomacy,” Francis said, asked by journalists about the prospect raised by Trump at the time of a “major conflict.”

In his interview with SIR, Igino Kim said the Catholic Church in Korea is focused on advancing denuclearization and peace-building on the Korean peninsula.

“A nuclear war would have devastating consequences on the whole of humanity,” the archbishop said.

Image: 

Members of the Daegu “Pueri Cantores” choir from South Korea play bells as Pope Francis greets the crowd during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican May 20, 2015. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Trump ‘determined to pursue peace’ after Pope meeting

BBC

US President Donald Trump has said he is “more determined than ever” to pursue peace in the world after meeting Pope Francis at the Vatican.

He was granted a short private audience with the head of the Catholic Church on the latest leg of his overseas trip.

The two men have in the past clashed on issues such as migration, climate change and a Mexico-US wall.

Mr Trump is now in Brussels for talks with Nato and EU officials.

He will also hold meetings with Belgium’s King Philippe and Prime Minister Charles Michel.

After the meeting between President Trump and the Pope, the Vatican said there had been an “exchange of views” on international issues.

Mr Trump, who BBC Europe editor Katya Adler says seemed star-struck, said of the Pope: “He is something, he’s really good. We had a fantastic meeting and we had a fantastic tour, it was really beautiful. We’re liking Italy very much… it was an honour to be with the Pope.”

Later Mr Trump tweeted: “Honor of a lifetime to meet His Holiness Pope Francis. I leave the Vatican more determined than ever to pursue PEACE in our world.”

He arrived in Europe from Israel and the Palestinian territories, where he vowed to try to achieve peace in the region.

The US leader began his foreign trip with a two-day stop in Saudi Arabia over the weekend, urging Muslim countries to take the lead in combating radicalisation.

Much-anticipated meeting

Mr Trump and his entourage arrived at the Vatican just before 08:30, in a meeting that was arranged at the last minute.

The US president was greeted by Archbishop Georg Ganswein, the head of the papal household, and escorted by the Swiss Guard to the offices of Pope Francis.

Correspondents say Mr Trump seemed subdued during their initial meeting, while Pope Francis was not as jovial as he sometimes is with world leaders.

The two men appeared much more relaxed at the end of their 30-minute private meeting.

The Vatican said later that they shared a commitment to “life, and freedom of worship and conscience” and expressed hope that they can collaborate “in service to the people in the fields of healthcare, education and assistance to migrants”.

On international affairs, their “exchange of views” covered the “promotion of peace in the world through political negotiation and interreligious dialogue”, and highlighted the need to protect Christian communities in the Middle East.

After the meeting, they exchanged gifts. Mr Trump gave the Pope a boxed set of writings by the civil rights leader Martin Luther King.

The Pope gave Mr Trump a signed copy of a message he delivered for World Peace Day, along with some of his writings about the need to protect the environment.

He also presented him with a small sculptured olive tree, telling Mr Trump through an interpreter: “It is my desire that you become an olive tree to construct peace”.

Mr Trump responded by saying: “We can use some peace.” He also said he would read the texts the Pope gave him.

Mr Trump also met Italy’s president and prime minister while in Rome.


Seeking common ground – analysis by the BBC’s Jon Sopel, Rome

Ever so slowly and flanked by the Swiss Guard the leader of the world’s pre-eminent superpower walked through the Vatican to meet the leader of one of the world’s pre-eminent religions.

And were there ever two more different people? Pope Francis with just the merest hint of a smile; President Trump beaming. They sat across from each other in the pontiff’s study as though one was going for a job interview.

During the election campaign, when Pope Francis visited the US-Mexico border he said that people who choose to build walls and not bridges weren’t Christian. Donald Trump said those comments were disgraceful.

And in February, just after Donald Trump had tried to introduce his travel ban from six mainly Muslim countries and suspended the refugee programme, the Pope tweeted: “How often in the Bible the Lord asks us to welcome migrants and foreigners, reminding us that we too are foreigners!”

The normal mantra when two world leaders meet is to say “there is more that unites us than divides us”. Almost certainly true. But there are real differences as well.


And the entourage?

Mr Trump was joined not only by his wife, daughter and son-in-law but also Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and National Security Adviser HR McMaster.

Both Melania and Ivanka Trump were dressed in black with their heads partially covered, in keeping with a traditional Vatican protocol that is no longer expected to be rigorously observed.

Melania, a Catholic, asked the Pope to bless her rosary beads.

In a light-hearted exchange, Pope Francis asked her what she gave her husband to eat. It was initially thought he had suggested “pizza” to her, but in fact he said potica, which is a cake from Mrs Trump’s home country of Slovenia. She laughed in response, and agreed with him.

Ivanka and Melania Trump at the VaticanImage copyrightEPA

What next for Mr Trump’s trip?

This is Mr Trump’s first visit to Europe since taking office in January.

Security has been stepped up across Rome, with the areas around the Vatican City, the Italian presidential palace and the American ambassador’s residence, where Mr Trump is staying, temporarily closed to traffic.

Despite the heavy police presence, about 100 anti-Trump protesters held a rally in one of Rome’s squares on Tuesday evening.

Significant protests are also expected in Brussels where he will meet EU and Nato officials.

This visit will be about damage limitation with the fervent hope of establishing some kind of transatlantic chemistry, the BBC’s Europe editor Katya Adler says.

She adds that the tone in Brussels has gone from off-the-record sneering when the erratic and unpredictable Mr Trump first won the November elections, to outright concern now that the implications of his presidency have begun to sink in.

Donald Trump, Pope Francis Meet, Vow to Fight for ‘Life, Freedom of Worship’

The Christian Post

President Donald Trump and Roman Catholic Church leader Pope Francis met on Wednesday at the Vatican where they spoke for 30 minutes in private, and vowed to fight together for life, peace, and freedom of worship.

“Honor of a lifetime to meet His Holiness Pope Francis. I leave the Vatican more determined than ever to pursue PEACE in our world,” Trump posted on Twitter following the meeting.

BBC News reported that the two world leaders held a 30-minute private meeting, with the Vatican later explaining that they talked about their shared commitment to “life, freedom of worship, and conscience,” and expressed hope that they can collaborate “in service to the people in the fields of healthcare, education and assistance to migrants.”

They also reportedly talked about the “promotion of peace in the world through political negotiation and interreligious dialogue,” along with the need to protect Christian communities in the Middle East, which are suffering at the hands of Islamic extremists. Continue reading

Pope Condemns US for using “Mother” in MOAB. Popery is MOAB: Mother Of All Blasphemers; Mother Of Abominations Blasphemies; Mother Of All Beasts

Andrew & Hilkary Henriques
Saved to Serve

As the representative of what many claim to be the “Mother” church, Pope Francis has publicly decried the United States’ biggest non-nuclear bomb being called a mother (Mother of All Bombs or MOAB). He further stated that a deadly weapon should in no wise be labeled “mother.” He then designates what a mother is, “‘I was ashamed when I heard the name…’ A mother gives life and this one gives death, and we call this device a mother. What is happening?’”[1]

Indeed the church Pope Francis sits at the head of is a mother and is verified in scripture—but not as the mother of Christendom, but the mother of harlots—the mother of apostate churches. “…I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication: And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH” Revelation 17:3-5.

“Protestant church leaders have expressed their disappointment at a document issued by the Vatican which reaffirms the Catholic stance on other churches. The Dominus Iesus declaration, which has been written by a close aide of Pope John Paul II, says that the Roman Catholic church is the ‘mother’ of all Christian denominations and that it is incorrect to refer to the Church of England and other Protestant churches as ‘sister’ organisations on a par with Rome.” [2]

It is unmistakable what power these verses bring to view based on the varied specifications.  According to verse 5 of Revelation 17, Roman Catholicism is not only the mother of harlots, but is also a MOAB of its own—Mother Of Abominations Blasphemies, or simply Mother Of All Blasphemers. This is an accurate representation of this entity considering the anti-Biblical, clearly pagan rituals, idolatry, belief systems and observances that can be described in no other way but as abominations and blasphemies. Revelation 17 is not the only scripture that delineates Roman Catholicism as a blasphemous and abominable power; in fact, every time this power is described in scripture, these identifying marks are highlighted so there can be no ambiguity as to who this power represents. Riding upon a scarlet colored beast, this power could also be classified as the Mother Of All Beasts (MOAB), as she is seen in control over the beasts of the earth(riding upon, holding the reins and directing); which beasts represent nations or kingdoms (Daniel 7:17 and 23).

Bible prophecy foretells a time in which Roman Catholicism will again wield the control she once had over the nations and will lead the nations to enforce her decrees and sustain her abominable and blasphemous institutions beginning in America (see Revelation 13:11-18). In Pope Francis’ statement concerning the use of the word “mother” to describe a bomb, he states that mothers give life, and that the “mother of all bombs” gives death.  Interestingly, it will be the “mother” church that gives life to the image of the beast and causes it speak and then destroy, not only liberties, but life itself.  Just notice the dichotomy: in giving life to the image, it causes those who do not worship the image to be killed. “And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed.” Revelation 13:15 (emphasis supplied).  Oh yes, the Papacy is a “life-giving” mother, but it is at the same time a destroying/murderous mother, a deadly killing machine, just as it has ever been since the days of its reign from 538-1798; truly a MOAB. 

Pope Francis has not a few times publicly criticized the actions and policies of Donald Trump; and neither has Mr. Trump been silent about his disagreement with Pope Francis. However, Pope Francis did send a congenial congratulatory message to Mr. Trump after his election as president, extending the “olive branch,” albeit for the self-serving motive of having greater influence over US politics. The two leaders are set to meet May 24 at the Vatican, the “mother’s” house. It has been just over 100 days since Donald Trump was inaugurated and already he is meeting with Pope Francis on his very first foreign trip as US President; and one purpose of the meeting is to fight “extremism.” This first meeting will likely set the stage for future encounters and greater cooperation moving forward to fight “common enemies.” While many journalists and others are expecting awkward and heated exchanges based on their history of pubic antagonism towards one another, prophecy foretells that the Papacy will dictate to the civil leaders of America (and other nations) to have Papal laws and principles carried out, and she will be successful in achieving this end. It must be remembered that before Jorge Bergoglio became Pope Francis, he was a sworn, high ranking Jesuit. He has never renounced his oath and allegiance to that organization. It is the purpose and practice of Jesuits to not only destroy Protestantism and reestablish Popery, but also, under various disguises to work “their way into offices of state, climbing up to be the counselors of kings, and shaping the policy of nations.” [3]

The time is not far distant when the “Mother Of All Beasts,” the “Mother Of Abominations Blasphemies, Roman Catholicism, will control the nations and religions by uniting them in a one-world system to fight what she defines as “extremism” and other world evils such as climate change, immorality and poverty.  Those who oppose and refuse to join this grand movement, will be targeted and detonated on by this MOAB and her allies. How shall we stand?   

1.  http://www.reuters.com/article/us-pope-bomb-idUSKBN1820LJ

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/910612.stm

3 White, Ellen.  The Great Controversy (1911), page 235

“It is our duty to dismantle deadly ideas and extremist ideologies”

Andrea Tornielli
Vatican Insider

The Pope to President Al Sisi and Political Authorities: “Egypt is called to condemn and defeat all violence and terrorism.” The invocation of peace for Palestine and Israel, for Syria, for Libya, Yemen, for Iraq, for South Sudan.

“Egypt is called to condemn and vanquish all violence and terrorism.” The call of Pope Francis to the Egyptian authorities is strong, in the second appointment of his short trip to Cairo. The meeting with about 800 representatives of Egyptian institutions, diplomatic corps and civil society takes place in a large salon of the hotel Al-Màsah, a hotel complex directly managed by the Egyptian Defense Ministry, located on an area of 75 thousand Square meters with a flight simulator and its own mosque. Continue reading

How Pope Francis is leading the Catholic Church against anti-migrant populism

Anthony Faiola and Sarah Pulliam Bailey
The Washington Post

As politicians around the world including President Trump take an increasingly hard line on immigration, a powerful force is rallying to the side of migrants: the Roman Catholic Church led by Pope Francis.

Catholic cardinals, bishops and priests are emerging as some of the most influential opponents of immigration crackdowns backed by right-wing populists in the United States and Europe. The moves come as Francis, who has put migrants at the top of his agenda, appears to be leading by example, emphasizing his support for their rights in sermons, speeches and deeds.  Continue reading

Pope with British Imams: the most important thing is the capacity to listen

Rome Reports

As an outward sign of inter-religious dialogue with the Muslim world, Pope Francis held a private audience with Card. Vincent Nichols and four Imams from England.
First, Card. Nichols greeted the pope, thanking him for receiving the audience and for supporting the UK especially after the attack on Westminster Bridge.
CARD. VINCENT NICHOLS
Archbishop of Westminster
“We want to also ask for your prayers. And I personally would like to thank you very much for the message that you sent for us.”
Pope Francis then said the most important action both parties could take right now is to listen to the other.
POPE FRANCIS
“What we should do to make the human nature better, it’s the work of the ear, the work of listening. To listen to one another amongst us. To listen to one another without making any haste to give a response. To listen to the voice of a brother or a sister and think about it before we give a response. But the most important thing is the capacity to listen.”
Afterwards, the pope greeted the four imams and delivered them each a medallion as a sign of peace.
MOULANA MUHAMMAD SHAHID RAZA
Chairman, British Muslim Forum
“Today we are making history. We bring you on behalf, the message of peace and understanding and cooperation. Thank you very much. May God bless you.”
After the traditional photo, Pope Francis said goodbye to them all before leaving.
POPE FRANCIS
“Thank you. God bless you.”

From Zenit

Before his weekly General Audience this morning, April 5, 2017, Pope Francis met with a Catholic-Muslim delegation from Britain in the auletta of the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall.

Present wer: Maulana Ali Raza RIZVI, President of Majlis and Ulama Europe; Maulana Muhammad Shahid RAZA, Chairman of the British Muslim Forum, Great Britain; Shaykh Ibrahim MOGRA, Co-Chair of Christian Muslim Forum; and Maulana Sayed Ali Abbas RAZAWI, Director General of the Scottish Ahlul Bayt Society.

Here is a translation of the Holy Father’s greeting to the participants.

* * *

I welcome you with joy. I like to think that the most important work that we must do between us, in humanity, is the work “of the ear”: to listen to one another — to listen to one another without hurrying to give an answer. To receive the word of a brother, of a sister, and then to think of giving my own — but the capacity to listen, this is so important. It is interesting when persons have this capacity to listen, speaking in a low, tranquil tone . . . Instead, when they do not have it, they speak loudly and even shout. Among brothers, all of us must speak, listen to one another, and talk slowly, tranquilly, to seek the way together. And when one listens and speaks, one is already on the way.

I thank you for this path you are undertaking and I ask Almighty and Merciful God to bless you. And I ask you to pray for me.

Thank you very much.

Pope’s Address to ‘Luther: 500 Years Later’ Conference

Zenit

‘All of us are well aware that the past cannot be changed. Yet today, after fifty years of ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Protestants, it is possible to engage in a purification of memory’

Below is the Vatican-provided translation of Pope Francis’ address to International Conference of Study organized by the Pontifical Council for Historical Sciences, on the occasion of the 500-Year Anniversary of the Protestant Reform (1517-2017) on the theme: ‘Luther, 500 years later.’ A Reflection on the Protestant Reform in the Historic, Ecclesial Context which took place in Rome, March 29-31, 2017:

* * *

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Ladies and Gentleman,

I am pleased to greet all of you and to offer you a warm welcome. I thank Father Bernard Ardura for his introduction, which summarizes the purpose of your meeting on Luther and his reform.

I confess that my first response to this praiseworthy initiative of the Pontifical Committee for Historical Sciences was one of gratitude to God, together with a certain surprise, since not long ago a meeting like this would have been unthinkable. Catholics and Lutherans together, discussing Luther, at a meeting organized by an Office of the Holy See: truly we are experiencing the results of the working of the Holy Spirit, who overcomes every obstacle and turns conflicts into occasions for growth in communion. From Conflict to Communion is precisely the title of the document of the Lutheran-Roman Catholic Commission prepared for our joint commemoration of the fifth centenary of the beginning of Luther’s reform.

I am particularly happy to know that this commemoration has offered scholars from various institutions an occasion to study those events together. Serious research into the figure of Luther and his critique of the Church of his time and the papacy certainly contributes to overcoming the atmosphere of mutual distrust and rivalry that for all too long marked relations between Catholics and Protestants. An attentive and rigorous study, free of prejudice and polemics, enables the churches, now in dialogue, to discern and receive all that was positive and legitimate in the Reformation, while distancing themselves from errors, extremes and failures, and acknowledging the sins that led to the division.

All of us are well aware that the past cannot be changed. Yet today, after fifty years of ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Protestants, it is possible to engage in a purification of memory. This is not to undertake an impracticable correction of all that happened five hundred years ago, but rather “to tell that history differently” (Lutheran-Roman Catholic Commission on Unity, From Conflict to Communion, 17 June 2013, 16), free of any lingering trace of the resentment over past injuries that has distorted our view of one another. Today, as Christians, all of us are called to put behind us all prejudice towards the faith that others profess with a different emphasis or language, to offer one another forgiveness for the sin committed by those who have gone before us, and together to implore from God the gift of reconciliation and unity.

I assure you of my prayers for your important historical research and I invoke upon all of you the blessing of God, who is almighty and rich in mercy. And I ask you, please, to pray for me. Thank you.

[Original text: English] [Vatican-provided text]

Pope: ‘We Are Called to Free Ourselves From the Prejudices’

Zenit

‘All of us are well aware that the past cannot be changed. Yet today, after fifty years of ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Protestants, it is possible to engage in a purification of memory’

“We are called to free ourselves from the prejudices,” and for the Pope, research is a way to do so…

Pope Francis stressed this while addressing the International Conference of Study organized by the Pontifical Council for Historical Sciences, on the occasion of the 500-Year Anniversary of the Protestant Reform (1517-2017) on the theme: ‘Luther, 500 years later.’ A Reflection on the Protestant Reform in the Historic, Ecclesial Context which took place in Rome, March 29-31, 2017. With a historical scope, there were no theological discussions.

The gathering marks the first time Catholics and Protestants together hosted a conference on historical sciences together in the Vatican.

“All of us,” the Pope highlighted in his address, “are well aware that the past cannot be changed. Yet today, after 50 years of ecumenical dialogue between Catholics and Protestants, it is possible to engage in a purification of memory.”

“Today, as Christians,” he encouraged, “all of us are called to put behind us all prejudice towards the faith that others profess with a different emphasis or language, to offer one another forgiveness for the sin committed by those who have gone before us, and together to implore from God the gift of reconciliation and unity.”

Reflecting on the study day itself, the Pope had said: I confess that my first response to this praiseworthy initiative of the Pontifical Committee for Historical Sciences was one of gratitude to God, together with a certain surprise, since not long ago a meeting like this would have been unthinkable.

“Catholics and Lutherans together, discussing Luther, at a meeting organized by an Office of the Holy See: truly we are experiencing the results of the working of the Holy Spirit, who overcomes every obstacle and turns conflicts into occasions for growth in communion.”

He expressed his joy that this commemoration has offered scholars from various institutions an occasion to study those events together.

“Serious research into the figure of Luther and his critique of the Church of his time and the papacy certainly contributes to overcoming the atmosphere of mutual distrust and rivalry that for all too long marked relations between Catholics and Protestants.”

“An attentive and rigorous study, free of prejudice and polemics,” the Holy Father pointed out, “enables the churches, now in dialogue, to discern and receive all that was positive and legitimate in the Reformation, while distancing themselves from errors, extremes and failures, and acknowledging the sins that led to the division.”

***

On Zenit’s Web page:

Full Text: https://zenit.org/articles/popes-address-to-luther-500-years-after-conference/

Top Vatican official urges U.S. bishops to lobby against Trump’s stance on climate, weapons, and migrants

Inés San Martín
CRUX

ROME– A top Vatican official is urging the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops to lobby in Washington against many of the latest moves by the administration of Donald Trump, from the so-called temporary ban on accepting new refugees to the defense budget increase.

Talking specifically about climate change, Cardinal Peter Turkson, of Ghana, said Thursday that if Trump didn’t listen to “dissenting voices”-including those of the Catholic hierarchy – and reconsider his position on this matter, the United States risks being supplanted by China as the leader in environmental protection.

After years fighting against carbon reduction, in recent times China has invested billions in renewable energy and back in January the Chinese president asked Trump to stay in the “hard won” Paris deal.

Pope Francis, who in 2015 wrote the first papal encyclical dedicated entirely to the environment, Laudato Si’, was a big supporter of this agreement aiming to curb global warming, which was signed in Dec. 2015.

Turkson noted that while Trump is moving in the opposite direction of the Paris deal, “there is another world power, China, which is showing different signs, filling the vacuum that America is creating.”

On Tuesday, Trump signed an executive order to bolster the U.S. coal industry, which was one of his campaign promises. He has also threatened to leave the Paris Agreement. Since then, both China and the European Union have rallied to support the accord. With Turkson’s comments, it’s safe to say that so has the Holy See.

Turkson, who heads the recently created Vatican Dicastery for Integral Human Development, was talking to journalists at a breakfast meeting to discuss an upcoming conference on Populorum Progresio [The Development of the People], a 1967 papal encyclical written by Paul VI.

He described Trump’s most recent executive order a “challenge.” However, Turkson also praised the “dissenting voices” within the United States.

“This, for us, is a sign that little by little, other positions and political voices will emerge. We hope that Trump himself will reconsider some of his decisions,” Turkson said. He added that the Church is “full of hope” that some of Trump’s positions will change once he sees the dissonance between reality and the promises made on the campaign trail.

Talking about the executive orders on immigration, the prelate noted that the last one was blocked by a court in Hawaii.

When he was asked about nuclear weapons, Turkson said that the seven billion dollar increase in the military budget presented by Trump “will have to come from somewhere, so the aid for development [will be] cut.”

It’s for this reason, he continued, that the Vatican is counting on the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops to lobby in Washington against some of Trump’s measures.

In the two months since Trump was sworn in, the USCCB has released at least 10 statements against his executive orders, and several more against other policy goals of his administration.

In addition, individual bishops and Catholic organizations have sent out many statements defending migrants, calling the travel ban “shameful”, emphasizing the need to protect the environment and warning against the “Put America First” budget.